Category Archives: news

copyright infringement: my guide to shime-machi

Update: They were totally reasonable and although it’s being taken down from the site because no JETs are currently living in the town, they’ve promised to add attribution when it gets put in the site archive. Phew.

I hate googling anything that I’ve done and having it come up on a site that isn’t mine. The worst is with no attribution at all, and no link back to the original. This is regarding my photos on Flickr 99% of the time, and although I want attribution in text (that’s my CC license, after all – these aren’t public domain), a link is still better than nothing.

Well, trying to find the kanji for the name of a burial mound I took a picture of in Shime, Fukuoka, a few years ago, I ran across a guide to the town that I wrote just after living there in 2003-2004. It’s on a Fukuoka JET web site, and guess what it says on it? Not my name, of course. It says “Copyright 2012 Fukuoka JET.”

Right!

Anyway, if you want to read a guide to my old town, you can see it here: http://www.fukuokajet.com/regions/fukuoka/shime-machi

I’ve sent an email to the administrator of the site, and have my fingers crossed that they are just reasonable people and will agree to my request for attribution. Sigh.

android slashdot reader: 和英コメントで言語学び!

Now that I have an Android phone and have found some pretty great things on the Android Market for getting ahold of Japanese content, I would like to start sharing with you all what I’ve been using and whether it’s worth downloading.

First up is my favorite new find: Slashdot Reader. Yeah. It’s an RSS feed reader for Slashdot. Why so great?

Well, can you imagine my reaction when I read its description and saw images of posts from slashdot.org and slashdot.jp showing up all mixed in together? Then I read the description: “just a feed reader, nothing more” – for both Japanese and English Slashdot.

It’s like I found an app made by my doppelganger. Really.

If you don’t want one or the other of the languages, it allows you to toggle both, Japanese only, and English only.

Because it’s a feed reader, you only get the headlines and leads from Slashdot, but can easily click through to the full story, and therein lies the amazing language learning tool that somehow never really occurred to me.

All of these years, I could have been learning Japanese through Slashdot comments! That’s right. Of course it’s not textbook Japanese. I already know how trolls (荒らし) talk after just a minute or two of reading. How nerds talk. (They always use が and never けど, although they do use ね sparingly for emphasis. A certain language teacher from several years ago who forbid us from using けど in class for an entire semester would be proud.) And how random users talk.

I also know how they’re basically saying exactly the same things that commenters do on Slashdot in English, only they’re saying it in Japanese. (open source != free as in beer, anyone? I seriously just read this. 無償 is free as in beer, and note that it’s not the same as the widely-used word for “free” 無料 – so I just learned something new about software licensing.) So if you’re a Slashdot reader, this is going to help you immensely. It’s all about context.

Yes, so there are people out there who would disparage the idea of learning language from internet comments. But I counter that with: it’s real language! And this is a specific forum where you know what is coming: some nerdspeak, some posturing, some trolls, some reasonable people, talking about a rather limited set of topics. So you are going to learn voices, not just “Japanese.” You are going to learn what people say in a certain situation, and also what not to say. I can’t think of anything more helpful than that!

And here you go: Slashdot Reader for Android (this takes you to Android Market).

new phone destroys old phone

I’m jumping headfirst into the 21st century here for once, rather than being dragged kicking and screaming. Yes, I have replaced an old electronic device (to be fair, only 1.5 years old) with a fancy shiny new one.

Samsung Epic 4G

I posted once about my Blackberry destroying certain parts of my internet life by being a laptop replacement that nonetheless can do fewer things. Well, I now have a laptop replacement that can do quite a few more things, but with a harder to use keyboard, and which sucks its battery down like you wouldn’t believe. Goodbye, poor Blackberry. I who defended you so stubbornly am now transferring your pictures away and will soon recycle you, and remember you fondly in spirit.

Blackberry Curve Purple

 

RIP Blackberry Curve Purple!

P.S. The new phone is one that someone else gave up for an iPhone and donated to yours truly. So I’m still in character, fear not.

Video Podcast: London Seminar in Digital Text and Scholarship

The School of Advanced Study at the University of London has just started a video (and audio) podcast series of the full talks from each session of the London Seminar in Digital Text in Scholarship.

Find the podcasts online here, or subscribe via iTunes (there is a link on the page to do so).

The first talk is Jan Rybicki with ‘The Translator’s Other Invisibility: Stylometry in Translation.’ Just another day I wish I lived in London, with all of the great digital humanities related seminars and talks going on. I read this scholar’s paper on the same subject in Literary & Linguistic Computing not too long ago and it was, in a word, awesome.

Iseya Opens to Commemorate Ichiyo’s Death

If you were in the Tokyo area today and lucky enough to hear about or come across this shop in the Hongo 5-chome area (Bunkyo-ku), Iseya 伊勢屋質店 (a 19th-century dime store) was open just for today, to commemorate the anniversary of Higuchi Ichiyo’s 樋口一葉 death. From @frognalway, info and a photo if you follow the link:

伊勢屋質店の外観。一葉の命日(11/23)に年に1回の公開をしているんですって。

Ichiyo is one of the authors I study, and is the woman you’ll find on the current 5000 yen bill in Japan. She died in 1896 of tuberculosis, at the age of 24, and just as she began to climb to the heights of an amazing literary career.

The question always remains, would she have been as famous – or as widely accepted by all of her male fans, friends, and critics, who were the big shots of the Meiji literary world – if her life had been longer, forcing her into a category after all, or into choosing between marrying (and quitting) or writing (and not being the right kind of woman). But that is only a what-if; for her life was far too short, and difficult, and poor.

By the way, this shop is allegedly the setting for her most famous work, Takekurabe たけくらべ.

post office as information central?

The future of the post office – and of snail mail generally – is a frequent topic these days. (Well, it has been for a while.) I listened to an excellent show from On Point the other week that had on several people, including someone with the post office. It was excellent in that the guests made several really strange points that were extremely thought-provoking, and I’d never heard them before. I think they deserve to be discussed widely: they broaden the conversation from just “post office or not?” and think about the actual role of this institution in serving its consituents. What is the point of the post office, anyway?

The post office delivers information, reliably (mostly) and often securely. It provides a way to get delivery confirmation and insurance on your stuff, rents out mailboxes (especially important for people in neighborhoods where mail delivery is unreliable, often due to the lack of safety and lack of access to mailboxes – and lack of maintenance by landlords). It lets you get stuff where it’s going, fast. I know that UPS and FedEx and DHL do these kinds of things too, but for general purpose information delivery, the post office is here to serve all of us, no matter where we are, no matter what. This is its mission.

As time goes on, demand and form of information changes, obviously. We’ve already had new technologies and new regimes of categorization that bave been developed to accommodate changing needs. I have only to look at pre-ZIP code letters to be reminded of this. Honestly, for someone who has grown up with ZIP codes, it’s shocking. Within my lifetime, moreover, the place of ZIP codes on the envelope has changed (no longer a need for a new line; in fact writing it along with the city and state is encouraged). We have even more, better technology for reading the messiest handwriting, for distinguishing that ZIP code (and now, a 4-digit code afterwards that means it’s your house) from the text written next to it. We’re getting pretty advanced, here, if you think about it.

So now there is the fairly dramatic change of declining mail volume, which has not been accompanied by a high enough increase in stamp prices to keep up with the times (really, every other country in which I’ve mailed a letter has been close to $1 for even domestic mail). We have a lot of people conducting their information needs online, even those bits of information that must be kept secure: banking, shopping, student financial aid and loan applications and processing, university business (I’m thinking of my own stuff here). We need secure document delivery, and we need it to be a lot better than it is now. Recent break-ins to companies that are holding customer and credit card information (ahem, SONY) are making this abundantly clear.

In light of this, do we need some kind of central, trusted authority that we can go to for secure document delivery?

I argue yes, and I argue that this is exactly a natural place for the post office to step in. I’m not talking about printing out PDFs and making sure they get securely to their destinations. I’m talking about a secure information infrastructure provided as a public service for all of us. No, it will not replace our banking or our insecure game network accounts. But don’t you think that this would be a great service, one that we can’t quite imagine now what it would look like… and one that exactly fits the mission and history of the post office?

Through any kind of calamity, no matter what, we will get your stuff securely and reliably to where it needs to be. We will make it available to you, no matter what.

This sounds a lot like the current mission that surrounds the delivery of paper mail and packages. I am not arguing that this should replace what they’re doing. Don’t close all the post offices and argue Internet for everything. There are still a lot of things that need to be delivered securely by post: you wouldn’t believe how few forms will take my secure Adobe digital signature on the PDF as the equivalent of a pen signature. Imagine being able to develop that pen signature (so easy to forge) into something more secure, in digital form. Would that not be awesome?

With the way things are going, I hardly think that anyone in government would consider this kind of natural evolution as worthy of supporting, as worthy of seed money for infrastructure. We are not so good at thinking outside the current narrow box of the status quo; we have blinders on that we can’t seem to remove. But the post office itself sees itself as needing a transformation for proceeding from here on out. If only innovation and creativity could win out, but I’m not holding my breath.

Incidentally, this whole post office closure thing? Most articles I read are about people complaining they would have to drive 6 miles to the nearest post office. Guess what. I have had to drive miles to the nearest post office my whole life, because I have been unlucky enough to grow up in the suburbs, then live in a city that thinks it’s a great idea to build their fancy new post office (and library!) miles away from our small but active downtown, and make it miles away from any public transit: you can’t walk either, because you’d need to get across several very dangerous freeway on and off ramps. Seriously.

in which I acquire typographical empathy

Guys. I humbly apologize for forcing you to read monospace font of your browser’s (or OS’s) choice for the past year. I’ve learned the error of my ways.

From now on it’s serif all the way.

And I now supply Linux font defaults just in case, which I didn’t before out of ignorance. At least there’s something to try to fall back on before font-family: serif now.

DH2011 – onward!

Hello blog readers-

I’m leaving for DH2011 at Stanford tomorrow. It looks like it will be a great half-week: I’m leaving early to attend two workshops over the weekend (Information Visualization for Literary History, and Network and Topical Analysis for the Humanities). There are amazing panels every day that I wish I had three of myself to send to cover them all. The keynote speakers are really something to look forward to. And most of all, it will be wonderful to be around so many people from my small field, with a great community and energy, and to get a chance to meet them in person.

I’ll be trying to keep up with blogging every day – I am not a live blogger and I don’t like to post notes without context. So plan on receiving a series of posts from me that give you a rundown of each day of the conference, reflections, or just pictures of any large scary bird or plant I come across. I will keep you updated.

Of course I will also be on Twitter, the most convenient way of broadcasting thoughts since passing notes in middle school. If you’re not already following me, I’m at @mdesjardin. And the hashtag is #dh2011.

See you at Stanford!

mac woe update: adobe drops flash for PPC

Sigh.

This article talks about much of my last post, with the focus not on Google Apps but on Adobe Flash: “Adobe Flash Has Left PowerPC Macs Behind

The reason I’m linking to this piece is that it makes an excellent point about “obsolete” PowerPC Macs (and even Intel Macs) not being so obsolete relative to their PC counterparts, but made so by Apple’s hardware decisions. Given that I haven’t owned a PC for at least 9 years, I had nothing to compare to, but this author points out that Apple dropping support for its older hardware sends perfectly good Macs to an early grave despite having the same or even better performance for still-supported older PCs.

On the Power Mac G5 and PowerBook G4:

While these highly capable PowerPC machines meet or exceed the Windows-based minimum hardware specifications required for the latest release of Flash Player, it matters not. Progress in the world of Mac OS X tends to make Apple hardware obsolete much faster than comparable Windows computers released in the same time frame.”

“I’m simply dumbfounded that fully capable PowerPC Macs continue to lose support and functionality with so many things that similarly aged (and often far older) Intel machines still receive” – as am I! Because I did not know that older Intel machines were supported for so long. Then again, this author makes the excellent point that support is being dropped for OS 10.4 but still retained for Windows XP.

It also makes me remember my general policy of “if it’s old and getting too slow, put Linux on it” because a Linux install will usually make most of the problems of an older Windows box magically go away. Indeed, Linux on older hardware is a good thing: but where is the support for older PowerPC platforms? In comparison, it isn’t really there.

It’s really too bad to see the end of this era. First the Dreamcast (an excellent RISC console that also runs Linux), now the Mac PPC line. It’s not that Intel/AMD architecture is superior: it’s just so common that it’s simpler to drop support for anything else. Unless there is another explanation?