Tag Archives: workshop

#dayofDH Japanese apps workshop for new Penn students

Today, we’re having a day in the library for prospective and new Penn students who will (hopefully) join our community in the fall. As part of the library presentations, I’ve been asked to talk about Japanese mobile apps, especially for language learning.

While I don’t consider this a necessarily DH thing, some people do, and it’s a way that I integrate technology into my job – through workshops and research guides on various digital resources. (More on that later.)

I did this workshop for librarians at the National Coordinating Council on Japanese Library Resources (NCC)’s workshop before the Council on East Asian Libraries conference a few weeks ago in March 2014. My focus was perhaps too basic for a savvy crowd that uses foreign languages frequently in their work: I covered the procedure for setting up international keyboards on Android and iOS devices, dictionaries, news apps, language learning assistance, and Aozora bunko readers. However, I did manage to impart some lesser known information: how to set up Japanese and other language dictionaries that are built into iOS devices for free. I got some thanks on that one. Also noted was the Aozora 2 Kindle PDF-maker.

Today, I’ll focus more on language learning and the basics of setting up international keyboards. I’ve been surprised at the number of people who don’t know how to do this, but not everyone uses foreign languages on their devices regularly, and on top of that, not everyone loves to poke around deep in the settings of their computer or device. And keyboard switching on Android can be especially tricky, with apps like Simeji. So perhaps covering the basics is a good idea after all.

I don’t have a huge amount of contact with undergrads compared to the reference librarians here, and my workshops tend to be focused on graduate students and faculty with Japanese language skills. So I look forward to working with a new community of pre-undergrads and seeing what their needs and desires are from the library.

my poor laptop, cont’d.

I’m being dragged kicking and screaming into obsolescence, despite having perfectly good hardware and a brand new battery.

This time, it’s not being able to upgrade to Java 1.6 without installing Yellow Dog Linux, following instructions for putting IBM’s PowerPC release of 1.6 on it, and hoping for the best. Ordinarily, I would do just that, but I didn’t know I needed Java 6 for anything until, well, yesterday.

It’s downright embarrassing. I have to borrow a laptop from a kind workshop organizer on Saturday at DH2011 because one of the visualization tools we’re running is a Java app that needs, yes, 1.6.

I’m being pressured toward a newer laptop more and more, apropos of my recent two posts which were more my complaining about something that wouldn’t necessarily force me to upgrade to something less than 5 years old. How frustrating!

(And I never thought I’d regret not having brought my Linux netbook along with me this summer, thinking there’s no way I could need a desktop and two laptops, which is ridiculous – but there is probably a JDK 1.6 sitting on that Ubuntu install. But there are 12 hours between me and the netbook until August. Too bad!)

A random positive note to end this series of posts about my ridiculous computing situation. When I was doing research to find Java 6 for PowerPC, I came across a cottage industry of people helping others install it (and Linux) on their – get this – 64-bit PPC Playstation3! It warms the heart to know that there’s still a phenomenal console out there (and really, it is the best of the three) that uses PPC architecture. Hooray for Sony (and for IBM, which is using 64-bit PPC architecture in their workstations and releasing the JDK for the rest of us).