Category Archives: conferences

#dayofDH Japanese apps workshop for new Penn students

Today, we’re having a day in the library for prospective and new Penn students who will (hopefully) join our community in the fall. As part of the library presentations, I’ve been asked to talk about Japanese mobile apps, especially for language learning.

While I don’t consider this a necessarily DH thing, some people do, and it’s a way that I integrate technology into my job – through workshops and research guides on various digital resources. (More on that later.)

I did this workshop for librarians at the National Coordinating Council on Japanese Library Resources (NCC)’s workshop before the Council on East Asian Libraries conference a few weeks ago in March 2014. My focus was perhaps too basic for a savvy crowd that uses foreign languages frequently in their work: I covered the procedure for setting up international keyboards on Android and iOS devices, dictionaries, news apps, language learning assistance, and Aozora bunko readers. However, I did manage to impart some lesser known information: how to set up Japanese and other language dictionaries that are built into iOS devices for free. I got some thanks on that one. Also noted was the Aozora 2 Kindle PDF-maker.

Today, I’ll focus more on language learning and the basics of setting up international keyboards. I’ve been surprised at the number of people who don’t know how to do this, but not everyone uses foreign languages on their devices regularly, and on top of that, not everyone loves to poke around deep in the settings of their computer or device. And keyboard switching on Android can be especially tricky, with apps like Simeji. So perhaps covering the basics is a good idea after all.

I don’t have a huge amount of contact with undergrads compared to the reference librarians here, and my workshops tend to be focused on graduate students and faculty with Japanese language skills. So I look forward to working with a new community of pre-undergrads and seeing what their needs and desires are from the library.

the first-world internet

I heard an interesting presentation today, but it concluded with a very developed-world, class-based interpretation of the Internet that I simply can’t agree with.

Although it’s true that more students are coming from abroad to study in the US (attributed in the presentation partially to budgetary issues in public schools in the US, another issue entirely), the idea of ‘globalization’, I’d argue, is really a concept based in the developed world. Yes, we have more students studying ‘cross-border’ topics, and interested in the world outside of the US. American students are coming into more contact with international students thanks to their presence in American universities, and perhaps gaining more cultural competency through this interaction. ‘Global studies’ are now a thing.

But this presentation talked at the end about the global power of the Internet, and globalization generally, about being able to reach across borders and communicate unimpeded. It doesn’t just have the potential to break down barriers, but already actively does so, this presenter posited. It doesn’t just encourage dissent but is already a channel for dissent, and an opportunity available to all.

International students in the US may be experiencing this power of the Internet, yes. But at home? Students from nations such as China and Saudi Arabia may not have experienced the Internet in this way, and may not be able to experience it back home in the same way as they can in the West, in Korea, in Japan, in other developed countries. (And I realize that’s a problematic term in itself.) Moreover, not all American students have experienced this Internet either. The students we find in universities generally already have opportunities not available to everyone, including their access to technology and the Internet.

There’s also the inherent assumption that this global access – and ‘global studies’ in general – takes place in English. While many students abroad are studying English, not all have this opportunity; moreover, their access to the educational opportunities of the developed world are limited to those opportunities they can access in English. Many undergraduates and even graduate students in the US limit themselves to the kind of global studies that can take place without foreign language competency. I realize that many do attempt foreign language studies and while the vast majority of undergraduates I encounter who are interested in Japan and Korea cannot read materials in their focus countries’ languages, they are often enrolled in language classes and doing their best. However, there are many more who are not. They do not come to the world – they expect the world to come to them.

And there are many, many students around the world who do not have access to the English Internet, or cross-border collaboration in English through the opportunities the Internet potentially affords (or doesn’t, depending on the country). They may not even have reliable access to electricity, let alone a data connection. This is changing, but not at the speed that the kind of thinking I encountered today assumes.

Related to this, another presentation talked about the power of MOOCs and online learning experiences in general. And yes, while I generally agree that there is much potential here, the vast majority of MOOCs currently available require English, a reliable connection, reliable electricity. They are by and large taken by educated adult males, who speak English. There is potential, but that is not the same as actual opportunity.

Overall, I think we need to question what we are saying when we talk about the power of the global Internet, and distinguish between potential and reality. Moreover, we need to distinguish exactly the groups we are talking about when we talk about globalization, global studies, and cross-border/cross-cultural communication. Even without the assumption of a developed-world, upper-class Internet, we need to recognize that by and large, our work is still conducted in silos, especially in the humanities. Science researchers in Japan may be doing English-language collaboration with international colleagues, but humanities researchers largely cannot communicate in English and cross-language research in those fields is rare. I can’t speak for countries other than Japan and the US, really, but despite the close mutual interest in areas such as Japanese literature and history, there is little collaboration between the two countries – despite the potential, as with digitizing rare materials and pooling resources to create common-interest digital archives, for example.

Even those international students often conduct their American educations in language and culture silos. Even the ones with reliable Internet access use country-based chat and social media, although resources such as Facebook are gaining in popularity. We go with what is most comfortable for us, what comes to us; that doesn’t apply only to Americans. Our channels of communication are those that allow us the path of least resistance. Even if Twitter and Facebook weren’t blocked in China, would they prove as popular as Sina Weibo and other Chinese technologies? Do Americans know what Line is or are they going to continue using WhatsApp?

If we find that English, money, and understanding of American cultural norms are major barriers to our communication, we might find other ways. Yes, that developed-world Internet may hold a lot of potential, but its global promise may not go in a direction that points toward us in America anyway.

free software day in Cambridge 9/15

Hi everyone,

It’s Free Software Day in Cambridge, MA, this Saturday (9/15) and there is a day-long event happening in celebration, and to bring the community together. If you’re interested in attending, it’s located at Cambridge College (1000 Mass Ave) and starts at 10 AM.

http://www.fsf.org/blogs/community/celebrate-software-freedom-day-2012-in-cambridge-massachusetts

creativity, goals, and the dissertation

I’ve been consulting some books on art-making lately, that you could broadly say are on that nebulous idea of “creativity” itself. (Art and Fear is the most well known of them and I can’t recommend it enough. It’s the best tiny book you’ll ever own.) As I’ve read more, I have realized that they apply not only to my artistic life – my life outside of the “work” of research and writing – but also to my current writing project as well. In other words, writing a dissertation, essentially a non-fiction book, is a creative undertaking of great magnitude and can be considered with the same principles in mind as would a painting or a composition or a mathematical theory.  (Fill in your creative path here.)

This was a revelation for me, despite the fact that I engage in drawing, painting, and creative writing as a part of my life: why would non-fiction writing for my “real job” not be creative work as well, and best approached with the same attitudes? Why  not?

So one thing that comes out of this is the issue of the goal. Art and Fear talks about this one and I’d honestly never considered it before. The goal often sounds like this: have a solo show, or get a piece in MoMA, or get a book published, or whatever. The problem arises that when the artist is successful and meets that goal, art-making can often cease completely, forever, because the goal has been met and there is no direction anymore, and nothing to aim for.

This book in particular recommends that goals should be more along the lines of “find a group of like-minded artists and share work with them.” Things that won’t be attained in a single moment, but that continue for the rest of your life.

It made me realize that yes, as a scholar, I have an end goal right now, and that is finishing my dissertation. After that, it’s a few articles, a monograph. But then what? And I don’t have a good answer for that. Thus, I am at high risk for becoming the same as the writer who quits after her first bestselling novel, adrift without an ongoing goal.

I wonder how scholars deal with this (I may just go and ask a few of them), but I think for myself, I’ve found a seed of it in a digital humanities project I’m dreaming up but haven’t had time to start implementing yet. It’s one that is less about content and more about opening up possibilities for exploring questions in ways that didn’t exist before, and to experiment with new methodologies that wouldn’t have traditionally come from my discipline. Sure, it’s building a database. But then it’s what to do with that database that’s the real project.

At the same time, I think a huge issue both in the arts and the academic humanities is that of solitude. I am not saying anything new here. Right now, a colleague and I are planning on co-authoring an article and attempting to get it published (please cross your fingers for us). I think it may be in my best interests, more than anything else, to keep in close touch with this person who works on things that are similar to my own work, and to keep picking up those business cards I like to collect from people I meet at conferences who are interested in my research for some reason, and routinely emailing them. My database project is something I want to leave open source and twist others’ arms to take part in. So I’m thinking now, as I’m nearing the end of my PhD course, where to start with the idea of forming a like-minded group to continue to share and collaborate with. To keep the end goal always moving and yet always fulfilled, because it is within myself and other people, and not just about me and something outside of me.

Video Podcast: London Seminar in Digital Text and Scholarship

The School of Advanced Study at the University of London has just started a video (and audio) podcast series of the full talks from each session of the London Seminar in Digital Text in Scholarship.

Find the podcasts online here, or subscribe via iTunes (there is a link on the page to do so).

The first talk is Jan Rybicki with ‘The Translator’s Other Invisibility: Stylometry in Translation.’ Just another day I wish I lived in London, with all of the great digital humanities related seminars and talks going on. I read this scholar’s paper on the same subject in Literary & Linguistic Computing not too long ago and it was, in a word, awesome.

DH2011 – onward!

Hello blog readers-

I’m leaving for DH2011 at Stanford tomorrow. It looks like it will be a great half-week: I’m leaving early to attend two workshops over the weekend (Information Visualization for Literary History, and Network and Topical Analysis for the Humanities). There are amazing panels every day that I wish I had three of myself to send to cover them all. The keynote speakers are really something to look forward to. And most of all, it will be wonderful to be around so many people from my small field, with a great community and energy, and to get a chance to meet them in person.

I’ll be trying to keep up with blogging every day – I am not a live blogger and I don’t like to post notes without context. So plan on receiving a series of posts from me that give you a rundown of each day of the conference, reflections, or just pictures of any large scary bird or plant I come across. I will keep you updated.

Of course I will also be on Twitter, the most convenient way of broadcasting thoughts since passing notes in middle school. If you’re not already following me, I’m at @mdesjardin. And the hashtag is #dh2011.

See you at Stanford!

my poor laptop, cont’d.

I’m being dragged kicking and screaming into obsolescence, despite having perfectly good hardware and a brand new battery.

This time, it’s not being able to upgrade to Java 1.6 without installing Yellow Dog Linux, following instructions for putting IBM’s PowerPC release of 1.6 on it, and hoping for the best. Ordinarily, I would do just that, but I didn’t know I needed Java 6 for anything until, well, yesterday.

It’s downright embarrassing. I have to borrow a laptop from a kind workshop organizer on Saturday at DH2011 because one of the visualization tools we’re running is a Java app that needs, yes, 1.6.

I’m being pressured toward a newer laptop more and more, apropos of my recent two posts which were more my complaining about something that wouldn’t necessarily force me to upgrade to something less than 5 years old. How frustrating!

(And I never thought I’d regret not having brought my Linux netbook along with me this summer, thinking there’s no way I could need a desktop and two laptops, which is ridiculous – but there is probably a JDK 1.6 sitting on that Ubuntu install. But there are 12 hours between me and the netbook until August. Too bad!)

A random positive note to end this series of posts about my ridiculous computing situation. When I was doing research to find Java 6 for PowerPC, I came across a cottage industry of people helping others install it (and Linux) on their – get this – 64-bit PPC Playstation3! It warms the heart to know that there’s still a phenomenal console out there (and really, it is the best of the three) that uses PPC architecture. Hooray for Sony (and for IBM, which is using 64-bit PPC architecture in their workstations and releasing the JDK for the rest of us).